Nicolas Sarkozy’s Libyan funds

Did Nicolas Sarkozy receive funding for his successful 2007 presidential election campaign from the regime of Libyan dictator Muammar Gaddafi? The documents published here suggest that he did. As do, also, several accounts given by former Libyan officials who were close to the late dictator.

Document online since
28.04.2012

The compelling evidence that Nicolas Sarkozy received funding from Libya

A document signed by a senior figure in Libya in 2006 states that the Gaddafi regime approved a payment of 50 million euros to back Nicolas Sarkozy’s 2007 presidential election campaign. It says the agreement was reached after a meeting between two senior officials of the regime and one of Sarkozy’s most trusted political allies, Brice Hortefeux, and Paris based arms dealer and business intermediary Ziad Takieddine (see: The Takieddine Files section on this website).
The following is a full translation of the document:


The Glorious People’s Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
“No democracy without a people’s conference”
Date : 10. 12. 2006
Corresponding to : 10. 12. 1375
N° 1917 68 P
Foreign intelligence service
Brother/ President, Libyan African Investment Portfolio

Peace be with you
With reference to the instructions given by the liaison office of the General People’s Committee concerning the approval of support for the electoral campaign of the candidate Monsieur Nicolas Sarkozy for the presidential elections, to the sum of fifty million euros.
We confirm to you the agreement in principle as to the subject cited above, having taken note of the minutes of the meeting held on 6.10.2006 at which were present from our side the director of Libyan intelligence services and the president of the Libyan African Investment Portfolio, and from the French side Monsieur Brice Hortefeux and Monsieur Ziad Takieddine, and during the course of which an agreement was concluded to determine the amount and method of payment.
Peace be with you, and the mercy of God and his blessings...
Moussa Imuhamad Koussa
Head of the Foreign Intelligence Service


Document online since
28.07.2011

When Takieddine organised the French interior minister’s visit to Tripoli minister

On September 6th 2005, Takieddine sent a "confidential" note to Claude Guéant headed "Visit of the Minister, October 6th 2005”. Apart from political matters to be discussed with the Libyans, on the subjects of terrorism, immigration and the situation in North Africa, progressing with the contracts – selling systems for border protection, identity cards and passports - was a high priority.

Document online since
28.07.2011

Sarkozy’s letter to the Libyan public security minister

On September 10th 2005, then-interior minister Nicolas Sarkozy wrote to Gaddafi’s public security minister Nasr al-Mabrouk Abdullah confirming his keenness to visit Libya. Upon Takieddine’s advice, he wrote: "Monsieur Claude Guéant, my principal private secretary, could travel to Tripoli before the end of September in order to prepare the talks that we will have."

Document online since
28.07.2011

Takieddine’s note to Guéant on the unusual contract proposals he was to raise with Tripoli

On September 22nd 2005, the arms dealer and business intermediary Ziad Takieddine sent a note to Claude Guéant, who was at the time chief-of-staff to then-interior minister Nicolas Sarkozy. Guéant is due to travel to Libya ahead of an official visit to Tripoli by Sarkozy. Among the subjects on the agenda for Guéant’s talks with the Libyan officials, Takieddine refers to arms contracts, notably the "protection of borders carried out by the French security pole led by Sagem and the ‘refit’ of the Mirages, Sukhois (170 in all)". Armaments deals of the sort would in theory normally be managed by the French defence ministry and not by the Ministry of the Interior.

Document online since
28.07.2011

Sarkozy’s chief-of-staff confirms his visit to Tripoli

On September 23rd 2005, Claude Guéant, then chief-of-staff to interior minister Nicolas Sarkozy, wrote to Libyan public security minister Nasr al-Mabrouk Abdullah confirming his arrival in Tripoli "during the evening of the September 30th and returning the Sunday, October 2nd".

Document online since
28.07.2011

Sarkozy’s close friend and political ally Brice Hortefeux joins the dealings with the Libyans

On November 15th 2005, it was the turn of Brice Hortefeux, then interior ministry junior minister with responsibility for French regional authorities, and a longstanding ally of then-interior minister Nicolas Sarkozy’s, to become involved in the dealings with the Gaddafi regime. In a letter addressed to Libyan public security minister Nasr al-Mabrouk Abdullah he expressed his thanks for being invited to Libya, and wrote of how his visit would be an occasion to bring up "different questions of common interest and to favour relations between the Great Jamahiriya and France in the framework of interior security and decentralized cooperation [projects]".

Document online since
28.07.2011

A French firm offers Gaddafi ‘an inviolable solution’ against ‘Anglo-American espionage’

In April 2006, Ziad Takieddine introduced to the Libyan regime a French group specialized in electronic warfare. Based in Aix-en-Provence, in southern France, the company, called i2e, was run by Philippe Vannier, now chairman and CEO of IT company Bull. The presentation documents i2e prepared for the Libyans boasted of the firm’s ability to counter-act the covert US-led Echelon global surveillance and communications interception system. “Echelon is a very confidential worldwide eavesdropping and analysis network operated by the UK-USA community,” it wrote. “Echelon intercepts radio and communications signals from satellites, telephones, fax machines, emails almost anywhere in the world [...] Our procedures are totally unique and offer an inviolable solution to the Anglo-American espionage system [...] Libya’s vital interests will not be spared by the Echelon system." The firm openly claimed a link to then-interior minister Nicolas Sarkozy. "The French Minister of the Interior disposes of genuine knowledge corroborated by collaboration with the company specialised in this domain. It therefore behoves us to assist you in carrying out an in-depth investigation on the nature of the information at risk of being obtained by Echelon."

Document online since
28.07.2011

Takieddine’s commissions paid by French electronics company i2e

On January 4th 2008, French electronics company i2e, specialized in signals eavesdropping and counter-eavesdropping technology, signed a deal with the Tripoli regime to supply equipment to the Libyan navy’s command centre. On April 10th 2007, 12e signed a contract for consultancy services with two companies belonging to Paris-based arms dealer and business intermediary Ziad Takieddine, Como and Tristar. According to documents obtained by Mediapart, between 2007 and 2008 i2e paid Takieddine a total of almost 4.5 million euros: one of the payments, to the value of 2.4 million euros was made to Como, and the other, to the value of 2.07 million euros, was made to Tristar. The commissions were paid despite the fact that such payments had become illegal in France as of the year 2000.

Document online since
28.07.2011

How Sarkozy’s chief-of-staff organised Gaddafi’s freeing of imprisoned Bulgarian nurses

According to documents belonging to Ziad Takieddine, President Nicolas sarkozy’s chief-of-staff Claude Guéant planned the programme for the freeing from imprisonment in Libya of five Bulgarian nurses and a Palestinian medic, in concert with Colonel Gaddafi’s security chief and brother-in-law Abdullah Senussi. A US law firm, Patton Boggs, was even tasked by the Libyans to handle the legal aspects. The Prime Minister of Qatar, Hamad bin Jassem, acted as an intermediary between the European Union, France and Libya. The nurses and medic were finally freed on July 24th 2007.

Document online since
28.07.2011

When Sarkozy’s chief-of-staff outlined a programme of future partnerships between the EU and Libya, and becomes a speech writer for Gaddafi

In a letter addressed to the Libyan authorities on July 20th 2007, newly-elected President Nicolas sarkozy’s chief-of-staff, Claude Guéant, outlined a programme of future partnerships between the European Union and Libya. He set out France’s intentions "to reinforce its bi-lateral cooperation in the fields of technological development, of civil nuclear power, of defence and of training".
In another letter prepared by Guéant dated August 29th 2007 and sent to arms dealer and business intermediary Ziad Takieddine for his approval, Guéant sent Muammar Gaddafi’s son Saif al-Islam Gaddafi a proposed declaration by the Colonel on the question of trade-offs for the release of a group of five Bulgarian nurses and a Palestinian medic imprisoned in Libya for allegedly infecting children with the HIV virus. Takieddine sent back to Guéant a corrected version.